Browsing: Behind the Cover

Since early in the Iraq war, Marines in combat have carried either the M16A4 rifle or M4 carbine, 5.56mm workhorses that leathernecks know well. Soon, the Marine Corps could adopt big changes to those weapons. While the Army searches for a possible new carbine, Marine officials want to overhaul both the M16A4 and M4, modernizing to make them more adjustable, accurate and comfortable. The effort to modernize the M16A4 shows a continued divergence with the Army, which continues to favor carbines and their shorter barrels. The Corps continues to stick largely with the M16A4 and its 20-inch barrel, which advocates…

This week’s Marine Corps Times cover story highlights an ongoing debate that could hit service members right where it counts: the wallet. In a trio of stories, Pentagon correspondent Andrew Tilghman explores where cuts could be made to military benefits. Reductions to tuition assistance and pensions are possible, and military officials also are considering a partial pension for those who serve at least 10 years. This week’s newspaper also offers three strong career stories for enlisted Marines. One focuses on promotion opportunities for sergeants, another looks at the Corps’ early-out program, and the third offers tips to Marines seeking their…

UFC-style competition will likely be rolled out Corps-wide within a year, according to Sgt. Maj. of the Marine Corps Carlton Kent. While Kent was clear that the final decision rests with the commandant, Marine officials are already in detailed meetings to discuss how an Army Combatives-style tournament system could be rolled out. Early this year, Kent sent Sgt. Maj. Howard Long, the senior enlisted Marines at Training and Education Command at Quantico, Va., on a fact finding mission that took him to the U.S. Army Combatives School at Fort Benning, Ga. There the Army’s master trainer, Sgt. 1st Class Jason…

It’s called “sexting,” the practice of exchanging sexually explicit photos with another person or sending racy text messages via cell phone. Mirroring a trend in society at large, there is evidence that lots of Marines are doing it, though the Corps does not keep data on the social phenomenon nor is it directly addressed in the UCMJ. It’s not illegal and not everybody thinks it’s wrong. But some Marines have already felt the sting of having what they considered private messages go public and, to their horror and embarrassment, shared with their chain of command.  Careers have been ruined, marriages…

This week’s Marine Corps Times cover story should strike close to home for tens of thousands of Marines preparing for that big decision: To re-enlist, or not? Effectively immediately, the service has unveiled four big changes that will affect how the Corps’ re-enlistment process works. They’ll play a big role in retention decisions made this summer, when most Marines submit re-up packages. The Corps’ selective re-enlistment bonus rates for fiscal 2012 will be released by July 1. I traveled to the 2011 Career Planners Conference in Tampa, Fla., last week to get the scoop, sitting through several briefs and interviewing…

Last night’s breaking news about the death of Osama bin Laden occurred well after this week’s Marine Corps Times was put to bed. Still, this week’s issue offers plenty of new perspective on someone you’ll hear a lot about in coming months: Lt. Gen. John Allen, President Obama’s nominee to become the next commander of the International Security Assistance Force and all U.S. forces in Afghanistan. Obviously, Marine Corps Times was part of the chorus initially reporting Allen’s selection last week, when Obama made his announcement. However, this week’s cover story offers a wide variety of details about Allen that…

As expected, the Marine Corps has expanded the rules for rating a Purple Heart for Marines who suffered mild traumatic brain injury. Bottom line up front:  it used to be a Marine had to lose consciousness to get a Purple Heart for mild TBI. Now, if a medical officer determines that a Marine is “not fit for full duty” after 48-hours from the time of the concussive event, the wound merits a Purple Heart. The new policy became effective April 15, and is retroactive to Sept. 11, 2001. This means thousands of Marines whose medical records show that they meet…

As Marine Corps Times first reported last week, the Corps will soon have a new top enlisted Marine: Sgt. Maj. Mike Barrett, of 1st Marine Division, out of Camp Pendleton, Calif. If you follow the Corps, you know that already. However, very little else has been published in the past about Barrett, a decorated infantryman who earned two Bronze Stars with “V” device for courage in Iraq and served as a scout sniper during the Gulf War. This week, Marine Corps Times’ four-page cover story profiles Barrett, his combat heroism, his leadership style and what he’s done behind the scenes…

UPDATE, April 19: Marine Corps Times posted online this morning the story teased below. It’s available here. In 1994, the Pentagon explicitly forbade women from joining combat units, saying they were banned from “assignment to units below the brigade level whose primary mission is to engage in direct combat on the ground.” The decree was made even as the military eased restrictions on other fields such as combat aviation, which allowed women to become war-zone pilots for the first time. It has stood for nearly two decades, including throughout the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Change could be in the air,…

If you visited Marine Corps Times online around the middle of last week, you may have seen our initial report introducing the commandant’s effort to re-evaluate how Purple Hearts are awarded to wounded Marines. In this week’s print edition, on newsstands now, we kick the can significantly farther down the road, laying out in greater detail how the plan is expected to take shape and why thousands of Marines — past and present — could soon to qualify for a medal if they suffered a concussion or other form of mild traumatic brain injury in Afghanistan or Iraq. Are you…

1 6 7 8 9 10 12
css.php